Hearken to the Light, 
that ye may feel the 
power of God in every 
one of you.
            --George Fox



Meeting for Worship
Sundays 10:30-11:30 AM 
(Nursery and child care available)

Opening Exercises  
Sundays 10:00 AM
I
n the School House, before Meeting for Worship
  September-June

First Day School  
Sundays
10:30-11:30 AM
September-June

Meeting for Business
 last Sunday of each month,
following Meeting for Worship

Eating Meeting 
2nd Sunday
potluck lunch after Meeting for Worship  
September-June

Friends find their essential unity in their profound and exhilarating belief in the pervasive presence of God and in the continuing responsibility of each person and worshiping group to seek the leading of the Spirit in all things. Obedience to the leading of that Spirit rather than to any written statement of belief or conduct is the obligation of their faith.
                                      —New England Yearly Meeting, 1985
Many people mistakenly think of Friends as a quaint antiquarian religion that probably died out long ago. They imagine that Friends' Meeting Houses scattered about the countryside are probably museums with little or no relevance to their modern lives. But, in fact, the Religious Society of Friends is a dynamic religious group that’s flourishing today.

We believe in absolute sincerity, simplicity, and moderation. Since we have no creed, but have strong beliefs, we’re guided by the Queries found in Faith and Practice, the guiding text to our beliefs produced by our Yearly Meeting. Essentially, we, as Friends, believe in the love of God, as well as the love of man.

What is a Quaker?

Quakerism is a Christian religion founded by George Fox in England in the 17th century. The official name is The Religious Society of Friends.

We believe that there is part of God in everyone. This belief leads most of us to:

  • refuse to be a part of any war or preparation for war.
  • respect others.
  • provide a strong education for our youth.
  • be truthful, even when not under oath

We have no minister or priest, since we believe each individual can communicate directly with God.

We worship in silence together on Sunday mornings. If someone feels they have something helpful to share, they stand and speak to the congregation.

We do not have communion or baptism.

We keep searching for the Truth—we don’t believe we have the answers for everyone.

This then is the Quaker Way.


< Back to our Home Page

You may be a Quaker 
(and not know it) if:

1. You don’t feel comfortable in your current religion.
2. You don’t like being told what you should believe.
3. You believe God should bless everyone, without exception.
4. You have concerns about our wars and the death penalty.
5. You don’t need a leader to help you worship God.
6. You enjoy a quiet time to reflect on your life and your world.

READ MORE ABOUT
 THE QUAKERS

Quaker History
Quaker Beliefs
Quaker Values
Friends FAQs
Quaker Marriage
Membership
 
Memorial Meeting

 
         A.F.S.C.            
Faith & Practice

Yearly Meeting
Famous Quaker Women

Read about our
 Basic Quakerism Course:
"Quakers Living in the Light."

Copyright©2008 Downingtown Friends Meeting           Site design and development by BBC Web Services